What does Alexa Chung actually do? and how do I become her? are two questions that I have yet to find answers to. For now I’m stuck stalking her style on Instagram, and then trying to find cheaper versions of it in real life.

 

Not one to wake up before 10am like…ever, I found myself sprinting into the shower and flying out the door before 8 one morning the other month. It was the opening day of Alexa’s latest clothing collaboration, and this was the closest I’d come to working out in the past year. Half an hour later I ran into Marks & Spencers, gasping for air.  I normally wouldn’t be caught dead entering M&S—a place I like to call “the K-Mart of the UK,” but this was different. I walked past groups of women on my way to the dressing rooms, every single one of them holding the same pilgrim, Miu Miu knock-off blouse I had picked out.

 

A single Instagram post by Chung wearing that shirt had caused it to sell out within a matter of minutes.

I didn’t even think of where I would wear it; I just bought it.

 

Alexa is exemplary of a growing number of street style stars and bloggers who are now either starting their own clothing lines or collaborating with brands on limited edition collections. With their millions of followers on social media, these digital ~influencers~ may very well be the future of fashion design. Never mind that the clothing quality is subpar (the Alexa Chung blouse I bought fell apart after wearing it once) or that the actual designs are copies of already existing creations (Kendall + Kylie…smh), these online celebrities have the fan base to buy their clothes, which so many new designers lack.

 

For a store like Marks & Spencers, which is seriously failing right now, bringing in a celeb like Alexa may help them temporarily but a celebrity-run clothing line is not the solution for the long run. As much as I love Alexa Chung, I love well made clothing so much more.

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